Resource Training Institute

RTII498 - Dirty Bombs and Radiation Dispersal Devices

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Dirty Bombs and Radiation Dispersal Devices New Mexico State University at CEMRC Carlsbad Three-day training course James Conca, Ph.D., and CEMRC staff Monday-Wednesday Lecture Room 102 Whole Body Dosimetry Room 160 Response training EC Mobile Laboratory and Field Site Radiochemistry Lab Room 151 Objectives - Synthesis Develop the ability to understand the nature and behavior of radiation dispersal devices, known as dirty bombs. Subject areas include: · the basic concepts of radiation physic and chemistry.

biological effects of radiation · hazard recognition · characteristics of a dirty bomb: the source and the explosives · nature of the various radioactive materials, their sources and numbers in the United States and around the world · how dirty bombs are packaged and how they can be dispersed · initial response actions · incident control and command · radiological survey instrumentation and dosimetry devices · Department of Homeland Security Guidelines for RDD events and what that means to first responders · clean-up and ways to mitigate the effects of dirty bombs · decontamination, disposal and documentation · when to respond and help with normal personal protective gear (alpha-bomb) and when to run (gamma-bomb), · when to return to work and living spaces after a dirty bomb attack Laboratory/Field activities will provide basic hands-on experience in dealing with dispersed radioactive materials similar to that occurring after a dirty bomb event, and experience with basic radiation monitoring equipment provided to most emergency responders. This course includes the basics of what every law enforcement, emergency responder, and cognizant citizen needs in order to recognize and respond to dirty bomb threats, and to make informed decisions in our society concerning the use and production of radionuclides that can be used in dirty bombs. This course is also useful for military personnel at oversea installations and on the battlefield, whom may be particularly vulnerable to a dirty bomb attack. Course material will cover the use of field sensors and how command could respond to prevent loss of tactical advantages. Just as with metropolitan area emergency responses, military units will require similar training and tactics for responding to a dirty bomb attack, although the built-in existence of a command center in the field allows more rapid and variable choices in countering the threat. Format, Workload and Assignments Lectures and assigned readings provide theory and examples. Laboratory/field activities provide hands-on experience. Grading: If taken for credit (two credit course): 1. Final Examination (30 minutes) 50 points 2. Class participation 50 points. Participants will receive 2.4 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for completion of this course.

Classroom Lecture & Exercises

This course is not meant for advanced students in the above fields such as the Department of Homeland Security, DOD, DOE, EPA and National Guard Civil Support teams, but for those interested in a basic understanding of these concepts.

Develop the ability to understand the nature and behavior of radiation dispersal devices, known as dirty bombs.  Subject areas include:

  • The basic concepts of radiation physic and chemistry
  • Biological effects of radiation
  • Hazard recognition
  • Characteristics of a dirty bomb: the source and the explosives
  • Nature of the various radioactive materials, their sources and numbers in the united states and around the world
  • How dirty bombs are packaged and how they can be dispersed
  • Initial response actions
  • Incident control and command
  • Radiological survey instrumentation and dosimetry devices
  • Department of homeland security guidelines for rdd events and what that means to first responders
  • Clean-up and ways to mitigate the effects of dirty bombs
  • Decontamination, disposal and documentation
  • When to respond and help with normal personal protective gear (alpha-bomb) and when to run (gamma-bomb),
  • When to return to work and living spaces after a dirty bomb attack

Laboratory/Field activities will provide basic hands-on experience in dealing with dispersed radioactive materials similar to that occurring after a dirty bomb event, and experience with basic radiation monitoring equipment provided to most emergency responders.  This course includes the basics of what every law enforcement, emergency responder, and cognizant citizen needs in order to recognize and respond to dirty bomb threats, and to make informed decisions in our society concerning the use and production of radionuclides that can be used in dirty bombs.  This course is not meant for advanced students in the above fields such as the National Guard Civil Support teams, but for those interested in a basic understanding of these concepts.

Lectures and assigned readings provide theory and examples.  Laboratory/field activities provide hands-on experience.

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