International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is the world`s largest developer of standards. Although ISO`s principal activity is the development of technical standards, ISO standards also have important economic and social repercussions. ISO standards make a positive difference, not just to engineers and manufacturers for whom they solve basic problems in production and distribution, but to society as a whole.

Company details

1, Ch. De La Voie-Creuse, CP 56 , Geneva 20 , CH-1211 Switzerland

Locations Served

Members

Business Type:
Service provider
Industry Type:
Environmental
Market Focus:
Globally (various continents)
Employees:
Over 1000

We're ISO, the International Organization for Standardization. We develop and publish International Standards.

What we do
ISO develops International Standards. We were founded in 1947, and since then have published more than 19 500 International Standards covering almost all aspects of technology and business. From food safety to computers, and agriculture to healthcare, ISO International Standards impact all our lives.

We are a network of national standards bodies. These national standards bodies make up the ISO membership and they represent ISO in their country.

ISO members
We are a network of national standards bodies. These national standards bodies make up the ISO membership and they represent ISO in their country.

There are three member categories. Each enjoys a different level of access and influence over the ISO system. This helps us to be inclusive while also recognizing the different needs and capacity of each national standards body.

  • Full members (or member bodies) influence ISO standards development and strategy by participating and voting in ISO technical and policy meetings. Full members sell and adopt ISO International Standards nationally.
  • Correspondent members observe the development of ISO standards and strategy by attending ISO technical and policy meetings as observers. Correspondent members can sell and adopt ISO International Standards nationally.
  • Subscriber members keep up to date on ISO’s work but cannot participate in it. They do not sell or adopt ISO International Standards nationally.

The ISO story began in 1946 when delegates from 25 countries met at the Institute of Civil Engineers in London and decided to create a new international organization ‘to facilitate the international coordination and unification of industrial standards’. In February 1947 the new organisation, ISO, officially began operations.

Since then,we have published over 19 500  International Standards covering almost all aspects of technology and manufacturing.

Today we have members from 164 countries and 3 368 technical bodies to take care of standard development. More than 150 people work full time for ISO’s Central Secretariat in Geneva, Switzerland.