Shell Cansolv – Gas absorption solutions

Shell Cansolv is a leader in gas treating and sulphur dioxide (SO2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) recovery technologies, with a high-performance portfolio of reliable solutions that can help meet the most stringent product specifications and emission limits at lower costs. The company provides regenerable amine-based capture technologies to remove pollutants from industrial off-gases. Our assurance is to provide custom designed economic solutions to our clients` environmental and regulatory problems.

Company details

Carel van Bylandtlaan 16 / PO box 162 , The Hague , The Netherlands 2596 HR Netherlands

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Business Type:
Technology
Industry Type:
Oil, Gas & Refineries - Gas
Market Focus:
Globally (various continents)
Year Founded:
1997

Provide high efficiency air pollution control and capture solutions.
Our patented technology will serve as the benchmark for stationary source air emission abatement around the world.
Provide custom designed economic solutions to our clients' environmental problems.

We aim to meet the energy needs of society in ways that are economically, socially and environmentally viable, now and in the future. Learn about our business and people, and how a small shop in London nearly 200 years ago grew to become one of the world’s major energy companies.

Royal Dutch Shell was formed in 1907.

Our headquarters are in The Hague, the Netherlands, and our Chief Executive Officer is Ben van Beurden. The parent company of the Shell group is Royal Dutch Shell plc, which is incorporated in England and Wales.

Our strategy seeks to reinforce our position as a leader in the oil and gas industry, while helping to meet global energy demand in a responsible way. Safety and environmental and social responsibility are at the heart of our activities.

We believe that oil and gas will remain a vital part of the global energy mix for many decades to come. Our role is to ensure that we extract and deliver these energy resources profitably and in environmentally and socially responsible ways.

We seek a high standard of performance, maintaining a strong and growing long-term position in the competitive environments in which we operate.

We aim to work closely with our customers, our partners and policymakers to advance a more efficient and sustainable use of energy and natural resources.

Shell is an integrated energy company that aims to meet the world’s growing demand for energy in ways that are economically, environmentally and socially responsible.

Shell is a global group of energy and petrochemical companies.

Our operations are divided into four businesses: Upstream, Integrated Gas and New Energies, Downstream, and Projects & Technology.

In Upstream we focus on exploration for new liquids and natural gas reserves and on developing major new projects where our technology and know-how add value for resource holders.

In Integrated Gas and New Energies, we focus on liquefying natural gas (LNG) and converting gas to liquids (GTL) so that it can be safely stored and shipped to markets around the world. The New Energies business has been established to explore and invest in new low-carbon opportunities.

In Downstream, we focus on turning crude oil into a range of refined products, which are moved and marketed around the world for domestic, industrial and transport use. In addition, we produce and sell petrochemicals for industrial use worldwide. Shell’s oil sands mining activities in North America are also part of the Downstream organisation.

Our Projects & Technology business is responsible for delivering new development projects and the research and development that leads to innovative and low-cost investments for the future.

Our strategy seeks to reinforce our position as a leader in the oil and gas industry while helping to meet global energy demand in a responsible way. We strive to create competitive returns for shareholders.

Safety and environmental and social responsibility are at the heart of our activities.

Our commitment to technology and innovation continues to be at the core of our strategy. As energy projects become more complex and more technically demanding, we believe our engineering expertise will be a deciding factor in the growth of our businesses.

Our key strengths include the development and application of technology, the financial and project management skills that allow us to deliver large field development projects, and the management of integrated value chains.

In April 2015, Shell announced its recommended combination with BG. This combination was completed on February 15, 2016. This combination should add significant scale and profitability to Shell, particularly in LNG world-wide and deep water oil and gas in Brazil. The combination presents an opportunity to accelerate portfolio refocusing in Shell through asset sales and reduced spending, resulting in a simpler, more focused company.

Shell’s core values are honesty, integrity and respect for people. The Shell General Business Principles, Code of Conduct, and Code of Ethics help everyone at Shell act in line with these values and comply with relevant laws and regulations. We also strive to maintain a diverse and inclusive culture within our company.

Shell General Business Principles

As a global energy company operating in a challenging world, we set high standards of performance and ethical behaviours. We are judged by how we act and how we live up to our core values of honesty, integrity and respect for people. Our Business Principles are based on these. They promote trust, openness, teamwork and professionalism, as well as pride in what we do and how we conduct business.

We were one of the first global companies to state and share our beliefs when we published our General Business Principles in 1976. As part of these principles, we commit to contribute to sustainable development, balancing short and long-term interests and integrating economic, environmental and social considerations into our decision-making.

All Shell employees and contractors, and those at joint ventures we operate, are expected to understand and continually behave in line with our Business Principles. We expect suppliers, and joint ventures that we do not operate, to apply equivalent principles.

In 1833, shopkeeper Marcus Samuel decided to expand his London business. He sold antiques, but now added oriental shells. He aimed to capitalise on a fashion for using them in interior design. Such was the demand that Samuel quickly began importing shells from the Far East, laying the foundations for an import-export business that would eventually become one of the world's leading energy companies.

Early beginnings

The market for oil remained confined to lighting and lubricants until, in 1886, the internal combustion engine and demand for gasoline arrived with Karl Benz and the first Mercedes. By now the Samuel business had passed to Marcus Samuel junior and his brother Sam. They exported British machinery, textiles and tools to newly industrialising Japan and the Far East and on return imported rice, silk, china and copperware to the Middle East and Europe. In London, they traded in commodities such as sugar, flour and wheat worldwide.

It was during a trip to Japan that Marcus became interested in the oil exporting business based in Baku, Azerbaijan, which was part of Russia at that time. The Rothschilds had invested heavily in the 1880s in rail and tunnels to overcome the transport difficulties of getting oil from this landlocked base to the Black Sea and from there to overseas markets. Shipping still posed a problem as the oil was carried in barrels, which could leak and took up much space in the ship’s hold

Revolutionising oil transportation

Marcus and Sam commissioned a fleet of steamers to carry oil in bulk, using for the first time the Suez Canal. They also set up bulk oil storage at ports in the Far East and contracted with Bnito, a Russian group of producers controlled by the Rothschilds, for the long-term supply of kerosene.

Their strategy was high-risk: if news of their operations got out they would be squeezed out by Rockefeller’s dominant Standard Oil. With the maiden voyage of the first bulk tanker, the “Murex”, through the Suez Canal in 1892 the Samuels had achieved a revolution in oil transportation. Bulk transport substantially cut the cost of oil by enormously increasing the volume that could be carried. The Samuel brothers initially called their company The Tank Syndicate but in 1897 renamed it the Shell Transport and Trading Company.

Petroleum was also being produced in the East Indies, a Dutch colony, and in 1890 a company had been formed to develop an oilfield in Sumatra. This was the origins of what was to become the Royal Dutch Petroleum Company.

Under the management of J.B. August Kessler, they built a pipeline and refinery at Pankalan Brandan. Kessler was joined in 1896 by a dynamic young marketing director, Henry Deterding, who was to become a dominant figure in the company until the outbreak of the Second World War. Faced with the competition from the Samuels’ low bulk transport costs, Royal Dutch began the construction of tankers and bulk storage installations and set up its own sales organisation.

Seeking new oil sources

By the turn of the century, Marcus Samuel had become the model of an Edwardian plutocrat with a grand house in London and a country mansion, which had been bought lock, stock and barrel with furniture, pictures and parkland from Lord Romney. He kept horses and a carriage and was active in public life in the City of London. He was knighted in 1898, became Lord Mayor of London and was a leading figure in the London business community. But Marcus Samuel’s dependence on Russian producers left him vulnerable and he decided to seek other sources of oil.

The Far East was the obvious place to look – and his first venture into Borneo brought him up against Royal Dutch Petroleum, one of the region’s biggest competitors. The two companies joined forces to protect themselves against the might of Standard Oil, forming a sales organisation in 1903, the Asiatic Petroleum Company. The discovery of oil in Texas offset a series of troubles which had affected both companies.

In 1904, the scallop shell or pecten replaced Shell Transport’s first marketing logo, a mussel shell. In various forms it has remained in use ever since, becoming one of the best known corporate symbols in the world.

Merger into the Royal Dutch Shell Group

The full merger of the two companies into the Royal Dutch Shell Group came in 1907. There were two separate holding companies with Royal Dutch taking 60% of earnings and Shell Transport taking 40%. The business was run by a variety of operating companies. The merger transformed the fortunes of both companies. Under the management of Henry Deterding they turned from struggling entities to successful enterprises within twelve months.

The Group rapidly expanded across the world. Marketing companies were formed throughout Europe and in many parts of Asia. Exploration and production began in Russia, Romania, Venezuela, Mexico and the United States.

The first twelve years also provided many exciting opportunities to demonstrate the quality of the products in the new, fast-developing market for gasoline. These included record-breaking races, flights and journeys of exploration. In 1907, Prince Borghese won the Peking to Paris motor rally on Shell motor spirit. The same fuel was used at the Brooklands racing track in the UK. In the Antarctic, Shackleton and Captain Scott used Shell fuel, while Bleriot’s inaugural cross-Channel flight was made on Shell spirit.